Recasting the home-work relationship: a case of mutual adjustment?

Tietze, S. and Musson, G., 2005. Recasting the home-work relationship: a case of mutual adjustment? Organization Studies, 26 (9), pp. 1331-1352. ISSN 0170-8406

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Abstract

Advances in communication and information technologies, changing managerial strategies and changing cultural expectations about the location of (paid) work, have meant that paid work is increasingly conducted from home. Home then becomes the place where the discourse of industrial production meets with the discourse of household production. We analyse the relationship between these two traditionally separate discourses, which, through the disintegration of the time/space compression, increasingly come to bear on each other. We report on the experiences of home-workers and their families coping with the co-presence of the sometimes conflicting and sometimes competing demands and values embedded in such discourses. In doing so, we contribute to current understandings of the complexities inherent in emergent forms of organization, as the relationship between work and home is recast. Theoretically and methodologically, this empirical study is located within a discursive framework, and we emphasize the usefulness of such approaches to studying organizational realities.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Organization Studies
Creators: Tietze, S. and Musson, G.
Publisher: Sage Publications
Date: 2005
Volume: 26
Number: 9
ISSN: 0170-8406
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1177/0170840605054619DOI
Rights: Copyright 2004 by Sage Publications. All rights reserved. No portion of the contents may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the publisher
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 10:34
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2016 09:10
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14948

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