Unlocking the potential to influence government skills policy: a case study of the UK construction industry

MORGAN, A., RAIDÉN, A.B. and NAYLOR, G., 2008. Unlocking the potential to influence government skills policy: a case study of the UK construction industry. International Journal of Training and Development, 12 (4), pp. 238-252.

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Abstract

Despite a series of national policy initiatives aimed at addressing skills shortages in a number of sectors, little evidence of longer-term change is apparent. This paper examines concerns expressed by small businesses that their local views are not sought or considered when national training policies and initiatives are either being developed or being implemented, and that the investment in skills development does not appear to adequately represent their skills needs. The research was carried out on the UK construction industry, which is characterized by a small number of large contractors who employ mainly managerial and professional staff, and a large number of small, micro- and self-employed firms that provide, on a subcontract basis, the majority of the industry's demand for a skilled manual workforce. The identification and delivery of vocational education and training at an industry level rests firmly on addressing the skills needs of the small and micro-type organizations and not those of the large construction firms, although it is the voice of the larger firms that appears to dominate the skills and training development agenda.

Item Type: Journal article
Alternative Title: Unlocking the potential to influence construction skills policy
Description: The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com
Publication Title: International Journal of Training and Development
Creators: Morgan, A., Raidén, A.B. and Naylor, G.
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell (CTA)
Date: 2008
Volume: 12
Number: 4
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/j.1468-2419.2008.00309.xDOI
Rights: Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 10:38
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 13:35
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15810

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