Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal and cognitive function: an exploratory study

Solis, M.Y., Cooper, S. ORCID: 0000-0001-5219-5020, Hobson, R.M. ORCID: 0000-0002-7119-3159, Artioli, G.G. ORCID: 0000-0001-8463-2213, Otaduy, M.C., Roschel, H., Robertson, J., Martin, D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8431-6659, Painelli, V.S., Harris, R.C., Gualano, B. and Sale, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5816-4169, 2015. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal and cognitive function: an exploratory study. PLoS ONE, 10 (4), e0123857. ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

Objectives: Two independent studies were conducted to examine the effects of 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4 g d-1 on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in omnivores and vegetarians (Study 1) and on cognitive function before and after exercise in trained cyclists (Study 2). Methods: In Study 1, seven healthy vegetarians (3 women and 4 men) and seven age- and sex-matched omnivores undertook a brain 1H-MRS exam at baseline and after beta-alanine supplementation. In study 2, nineteen trained male cyclists completed four 20-Km cycling time trials (two pre supplementation and two post supplementation), with a battery of cognitive function tests (Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm, Rapid Visual Information Processing task) being performed before and after exercise on each occasion. Results: In Study 1, there were no within-group effects of beta-alanine supplementation on brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal in either vegetarians (p = 0.99) or omnivores (p = 0.27); nor was there any effect when data from both groups were pooled (p = 0.19). Similarly, there was no group by time interaction for brain homocarnosine/carnosine signal (p = 0.27). In study 2, exercise improved cognitive function across all tests (P<0.05), although there was no effect (P>0.05) of beta-alanine supplementation on response times or accuracy for the Stroop test, Sternberg paradigm or RVIP task at rest or after exercise. Conclusion: 28 d of beta-alanine supplementation at 6.4g d-1 appeared not to influence brain homocarnosine/ carnosine signal in either omnivores or vegetarians; nor did it influence cognitive function before or after exercise in trained cyclists.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Creators: Solis, M.Y., Cooper, S., Hobson, R.M., Artioli, G.G., Otaduy, M.C., Roschel, H., Robertson, J., Martin, D., Painelli, V.S., Harris, R.C., Gualano, B. and Sale, C.
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Place of Publication: San Francisco, CA
Date: 14 April 2015
Volume: 10
Number: 4
ISSN: 1932-6203
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1371/journal.pone.0123857DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 10:38
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2017 13:53
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15843

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