Sensitivity to the acoustic correlates of lexical stress and their relationship to reading in skilled readers

Williams, G.J. ORCID: 0000-0001-7689-1231 and Wood, C. ORCID: 0000-0003-1492-6501, 2012. Sensitivity to the acoustic correlates of lexical stress and their relationship to reading in skilled readers. Advances in Cognitive Psychology, 8 (4), pp. 267-280.

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Abstract

The role of suprasegmental information in reading processes is a growing area of interest, and sensitivity to lexical stress has been shown to explain unique variance in reading development. However, less is known about its role in skilled reading. This study aimed to investigate the acoustic features of suprasegmental information using a same/different cross-modal matching task. Sixty-four adult participants completed standardized measures of reading accuracy, reading speed, and comprehension and performed an experimental task. The experimental task required the participants to identify whether non-speech acoustic sequences matched the characteristics of written words. The findings indicated differences in responses depending on where the lexical stress was required for the word. Moreover, evidence was found to support the view that amplitude information is part of the word knowledge retrieval process in skilled reading. The findings are discussed relative to models of reading and the role of lexical stress in lexical access.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Advances in Cognitive Psychology
Creators: Williams, G.J. and Wood, C.
Publisher: Vizja Press on behalf of the University of Finance and Management in Warsaw
Date: 2012
Volume: 8
Number: 4
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.5709/acp-0122-0DOI
Rights: ACP applies the creative common license CC-BY-NC-ND (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) to published articles. Under this Open Access license, authors agree that anyone can copy and distribute the article for free as long as appropriate credit is given and the article is not modified and not used for commercial purposes.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 10:39
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2018 07:38
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/16152

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