The currency of talent management - a reply to "talent management and the relevance of context: towards a pluralistic approach"

TANSLEY, C., KIRK, S. and TIETZE, S., 2013. The currency of talent management - a reply to "talent management and the relevance of context: towards a pluralistic approach". Human Resource Management Review, 23 (4), pp. 337-340. ISSN 1053-4822

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Abstract

In this paper we provide a commentary on the article in this special issue by Thunnissen, Boselie, and Fruytier on the relevance of context to the field of talent management. We agree that further research is needed to explore the link between macro, meso and micro-level considerations. The authors pose a question in relation to the contribution of talent management to the social and moral development of society; which, for us, raises issues as to the extent to which individual agency in ethical issues is possible in environments designed to regulate and control talent. We concur that a more critical, pluralist approach to talent management scholarship is needed and that talent management should go beyond a mere economic exchange. We suggest, as Yet unexplored, notions of strategic exchange, and individual identity provide a richer picture of the employment relationship. Thus this paper raises a number of possible directions for future TM research.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Human Resource Management Review
Creators: Tansley, C., Kirk, S. and Tietze, S.
Publisher: Elsevier
Place of Publication: Elsevier
Date: December 2013
Volume: 23
Number: 4
ISSN: 1053-4822
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.hrmr.2013.08.004DOI
S1053482213000399Publisher Item Identifier
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 10:47
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 13:39
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/18215

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