Low-cost QCM sensor system for screening semen samples

Newton, MI ORCID: 0000-0003-4231-1002, Atherton, S, Morris, RH ORCID: 0000-0001-5511-3457, Stanley, SM, Evans, CR, Hughes, DC and McHale, G, 2010. Low-cost QCM sensor system for screening semen samples. Journal of Sensors, 2010.

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Abstract

Artificial insemination is a well-established part of modern agricultural practice. A viable semen sample is judged by the total number of spermatozoa (sperm) in the sample and the motility of the sperm. In this paper, we report the development of a reusable measurement cell and electronics for screening semen samples based on the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) and Universal Frequency to Digital Converter (UFDC-1) to produce a low-cost sensor system. After introducing the semen sample at one end of the measurement cell, sperm swim down a channel before causing a frequency change on the QCM. Data is presented that shows the different frequency changes using a commercial frequency counter caused by porcine semen samples, one two days old and one twenty one days old. Similar data is presented for a motile semen sample measurement using the low-cost UFDC-1.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Sensors
Creators: Newton, M.I., Atherton, S., Morris, R.H., Stanley, S.M., Evans, C.R., Hughes, D.C. and McHale, G.
Publisher: Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Date: 2010
Volume: 2010
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1155/2010/326365DOI
Rights: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons AttributionLicense, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 10:55
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 13:44
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/20068

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