Interpreting the Outsider Tradition in British European Policy Speeches from Thatcher to Cameron

Daddow, O., 2015. Interpreting the Outsider Tradition in British European Policy Speeches from Thatcher to Cameron. Journal of Common Market Studies, 53 (1), pp. 71-88. ISSN 0021-9886

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Abstract

The article investigates how British European policy thinking has been informed by what it identifies as an ‘outsider’ tradition of thinking about ‘Europe’ in British foreign policy dating from imperial times to the presen. The article begins by delineating five phases in the evolution of the outsider tradition through a survey of the relevant historiography back to 1815. The article then examines how prime ministers from Margaret Thatcher to David Cameron have looked to various inflections of the outsider tradition to inform their European discourses. The focus in the speech data sections is on British identity, history and the realist appreciation of international politics that informed the leaders’ suggestions for EEC/EU reform. The central argument is that historically informed narratives such as those making up the outsider tradition do not determine opinion-formers’ outlooks, but that they can be deeply impervious to rapid change.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Common Market Studies
Creators: Daddow, O.
Publisher: Wiley
Date: 2015
Volume: 53
Number: 1
ISSN: 0021-9886
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/jcms.12204DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 03 Nov 2015 11:30
Last Modified: 24 Aug 2016 10:29
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/26113

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