The prevalence of compulsive buying: a meta-analysis

Maraz, A, Griffiths, MD ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524 and Demetrovics, Z, 2016. The prevalence of compulsive buying: a meta-analysis. Addiction, 111 (3), pp. 408-419. ISSN 0965-2140

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Abstract

Aims: To estimate the pooled prevalence of compulsive buying behaviour (CBB) indifferent populations and to determine the effect of age, gender, location and screening instrument on the reported heterogeneity inestimates of CBB and whether publication bias could be identified. Methods: Three databases were searched(Medline, PsychInfo, Web of Science) using the terms 'compulsive buying' 'pathological buying' and 'compulsive shopping' to estimate the pooled prevalence of CBB in different populations. Forty studies reporting 49 prevalence estimates from 16 countries were located (n=32000). To conduct the meta-analysis, data from non-clinical studies regarding mean age and gender proportion, geographical study location and screening instrument used to assess CBB were extracted by multiple independent observers and evaluated using a random-effects model. Four a priori subgroups were analysed using pooled estimation (Cohen's Q) and covariate testing (moderator and meta-regression analysis). Results: The CBB pooled prevalence of adult representative studies was 4.9% (3.4–6.9%, eight estimates, 10 102 participants), although estimates were higher among university students: 8.3% (5.9–11.5%,19 estimates, 14 947 participants) in adult non-representative samples: 12.3% (7.6–19.1%, 11 estimates, 3929 participants) and in shopping-specific samples: 16.2% (8.8–27.8%, 11 estimates, 4686 participants). Being young and female were associated with increased tendency, but not location (United States versus non-United States). Meta-regression revealed large heterogeneity within subgroups,due mainly to diverse measures and time-frames(current versus life-time) used to assess CBB. Conclusions: A pooled estimate of compulsive buying behaviour in the populations studied is approximately 5%, but there is large variation between samples accounted for largely by use of different time-frames and measures.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Addiction
Creators: Maraz, A., Griffiths, M.D. and Demetrovics, Z.
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Date: 2016
Volume: 111
Number: 3
ISSN: 0965-2140
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/add.13223DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 17 Mar 2016 12:21
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 14:00
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/27158

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