Making the most of housing and growth in the East Midlands: a report on removing the barriers to low public investment in the region

Gilhespy, D, Clark, R, Lawton, C ORCID: 0000-0002-6744-5990 and Rossiter, W ORCID: 0000-0002-2199-1136, 2012. Making the most of housing and growth in the East Midlands: a report on removing the barriers to low public investment in the region. Research report for external body. London: The Smith Institute.

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Abstract

The Smith Institute, in association with the Economic Strategy Research Bureau at Nottingham Business School, has undertaken an investigation into the lack of central government investment in the East Midlands in housing and physical regeneration. The work has been based on desk research, two round tables with stakeholders (in Nottingham and Melton Mowbray) and interviews with over 30 decision makers, experts and opinion formers from across the region. The objectives of the report were: first, to quantify the reduction in central government investment in the region compared with other regions; second, to suggest reasons why this might have
occurred; third, to consider the impact that this might be having on the implementation of government policies such as housing provision, “rebalancing” the economy and achieving greater value for money for government investment. The report concludes with a number of recommendations for local enterprise partnerships
(LEPs), local authorities, the housing sector and central
government.

Item Type: Research report for external body
Creators: Gilhespy, D., Clark, R., Lawton, C. and Rossiter, W.
Publisher: The Smith Institute
Place of Publication: London
Date: 2012
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Depositing User: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 07 Apr 2016 12:57
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 14:01
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/27430

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