Theoretical investigation of soil-based thermal energy storage system for greenhouses

Cuce, E., Ding, Y., Riffat, S. and Lu, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-0064-4725, 2016. Theoretical investigation of soil-based thermal energy storage system for greenhouses. In: L.T. Rodrigues, ed., Sustainable energy for a resilient future: proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Sustainable Energy Technologies, 25-27 August 2015, Nottingham, UK: volume I. Nottingham: University of Nottingham: Architecture, Energy & Environment Research Group, pp. 679-683. ISBN 9780853583134

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Abstract

In this short communication, a novel thermal energy storage system for greenhouses is presented. The novel system is based on directly heating a particular mass of soil through the solar power and utilizing the energy stored in critical months such as November, December, January and February. The target mass of soil is placed beneath the greenhouse with a height of 2m and the boundaries are well-insulated via vacuum insulation panels to provide adiabatic conditions yielding to no heat loss from the edges. Through electric heaters placed
inside the target mass of soil, thermal energy is stored inside the soil via the power coming from photovoltaic
(PV) panels fixed on the roof of the greenhouse. A specific thin film PV glazing technology called heat insulation solar glass (HISG) is preferred for the power input to the greenhouse. As the first aim of the research, heating demand of the greenhouse is determined for each month. Temperature difference and overall heat transfer coefficient between indoor and outdoor environment are considered to be independent variables in the analyses. Secondly, soil-based thermal energy storage system is introduced and its potential contribution to the heating demand is discussed. The preliminary results indicate that the soil mass is a dominant parameter in soil temperature and hence the thermal energy storage capacity. For a soil mass of 250 tonne, around 600K soil
temperature is achieved by the end of year, which is very remarkable.

Item Type: Chapter in book
Description: Paper no. 234.
Creators: Cuce, E., Ding, Y., Riffat, S. and Lu, C.
Publisher: University of Nottingham: Architecture, Energy & Environment Research Group
Place of Publication: Nottingham
Date: 2016
Volume: I
Rights: © Copyright University of Nottingham & WSSET.
Divisions: Schools > School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 19 May 2016 14:25
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 14:02
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/27815

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