Parathyroid hormone secretion is controlled by both ionised calcium and phosphate during exercise and recovery in men

Townsend, R., Elliott-Sale, K.J. ORCID: 0000-0003-1122-5099, Jessica Pinto, A., Thomas, C., Scott, J.P.R., Currell, K., Fraser, W.D. and Sale, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5816-4169, 2016. Parathyroid hormone secretion is controlled by both ionised calcium and phosphate during exercise and recovery in men. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. ISSN 0021-972X

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Abstract

The mechanism by which PTH is controlled during and after exercise is poorly understood due to insufficient temporal frequency of measurements. Objective: To examine the temporal pattern of PTH, PO4, ACa and Ca2+ during and after exercise. Design and setting: A laboratory-based study with a cross-over design, comparing 30 min of running at 55%, 65% and 75%VO2max, followed by 2.5-h of recovery. Blood was obtained at baseline, after 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 min of exercise and after 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 60, 90 and 150 min of recovery. Participants: Ten men (age 23±1 y, height 1.82±0.07 m, body mass 77.0±7.5 kg) participated. Main Outcome Measures: PTH, PO4, ACa and Ca2+ Results: Independent of intensity, PTH concentrations decreased with the onset of exercise (-21 to -33%; P≤0.001), increased thereafter and were higher than baseline by the end of exercise at 75%VO2max (+52%; P≤0.001). PTH peaked transiently after 5–7.5 min of recovery (+73 to +110%; P≤0.001). PO4 followed a similar temporal pattern to PTH and Ca2+ followed a similar but inverse pattern to PTH. PTH was negatively correlated with Ca2+ across all intensities (r=-0.739 to -0.790; P≤0.001). When PTH was increasing, the strongest cross-correlation was with Ca2+ at 0 lags (3.5 min) (r=-0.902 to -0.950); during recovery, the strongest cross-correlation was with PO4 at 0 lags (8 min) (r=0.987 to 0.995). Conclusions: PTH secretion during exercise and recovery is controlled by a combination of changes in Ca2+ and PO4 in men.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
Creators: Townsend, R., Elliott-Sale, K.J., Jessica Pinto, A., Thomas, C., Scott, J.P.R., Currell, K., Fraser, W.D. and Sale, C.
Publisher: Endocrine Society
Date: 2016
ISSN: 0021-972X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1210/jc.2016-1848DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 22 Jun 2016 11:13
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 13:35
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/28004

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