Respiratory muscle work and inspiratory muscle training on cytokines, oxidative stress and diaphragm fatigue in younger and older populations

MILLS, D.E., 2013. Respiratory muscle work and inspiratory muscle training on cytokines, oxidative stress and diaphragm fatigue in younger and older populations. PhD, Nottingham Trent University.

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Abstract

Increased respiratory muscle work is encountered during strenuous whole-body exercise, and at rest in older adults and those with pulmonary limitations such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). When sufficiently strenuous it can result in diaphragmatic fatigue, increased blood lactate concentrations, and an alteration in respiratory muscle recruitment patterns. Increased respiratory muscle work also elevates cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) within the respiratory muscles and systemically. There is mounting evidence that inflammation contributes significantly to the ageing process and age related diseases. Enhanced oxidative stress, glycogen depletion and diaphragmatic fatigue are all potential stimuli for this production. Whole-body exercise training can attenuate systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in younger adults during exercise, and in older adults who experience this at rest. An attenuation of muscle glycogen or increases in antioxidant enzymes may explain such reductions. Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) may also elicit similar adaptations in the inspiratory muscles, and thus also attenuate these markers.

Item Type: Thesis
Creators: Mills, D.E.
Date: 2013
Rights: This work is the intellectual property of the author. You may copy up to 5% of this work for private study, or personal, non-commercial research. Any re-use of the information contained within this document should be fully referenced, quoting the author, title, university, degree level and pagination. Queries or requests for any other use, or if a more substantial copy is required, should be directed in the first instance to the author.
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Added: 09 Oct 2015 09:35
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2015 09:35
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/286

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