How to teach 'Smart Fashion' within the D&T curriculum: have we got it right?

Davies, S. ORCID: 0000-0003-1151-7841 and Hardy, A. ORCID: 0000-0002-6970-1695, 2016. How to teach 'Smart Fashion' within the D&T curriculum: have we got it right? In: PATT2016: Technology Education for 21st Century Skills Conference, Hogeschool Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands, 23-26 August 2016.

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Abstract

The English design and technology (D&T) curriculum places a greater emphasis on the teaching of electronic systems within a fashion context. E-textiles, are fabrics with embedded electronic circuits that create Smart Fashion products, which interact with the body and environment. Previous research by Davies and Rutland (2014) identified that teachers perceived this kind of curriculum as difficult to design and resource, within the classroom. In this paper we report on some of the initial results from the evaluation of a set of teaching resources, that have been created and tested with teachers, as part of a larger study into how Smart Fashion curriculum can be supported in the classroom. Data collected from the teaching resources and teacher interviews was analysed against current theories of 'best practice'. The findings describe the potential of the resources to support learners in developing an understanding of what e-textiles are and how they can be made. This understanding can then be applied to the designing and making of Smart Fashion products.

Item Type: Conference contribution
Creators: Davies, S. and Hardy, A.
Contributors:
NameRoleORCID
de Vries, M.EditorUNSPECIFIED
Bekker, A.EditorUNSPECIFIED
van Dijk, G.EditorUNSPECIFIED
Date: 26 August 2016
Divisions: Schools > School of Education
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 10 Oct 2016 15:05
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2017 14:07
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/28812

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