Online and offline video game use in adolescents: measurement invariance and problem severity

Smohai, M., Urbán, R., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, Király, O., Mirnics, Z., Vargha, A. and Demetrovics, Z., 2017. Online and offline video game use in adolescents: measurement invariance and problem severity. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse: Encompassing All Addictive Disorders, 43 (1), pp. 111-116. ISSN 0095-2990

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Abstract

Background:
Despite the increasing popularity of videogame playing, little is known about the similarities and differences between online and offline videogame players. However, the characteristics of online and offline gaming might predispose different pattern of problematic use.
Objectives:
The aims of this study were to (i) test applicability and the measurement invariance of the previously developed Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire (POGQ) in both online and offline gamers; and (ii) examine the differences between online and offline gamers in the dimensions of problematic use.
Methods:
A total of 1,964 adolescent videogame players were recruited. Information on videogame use habits were collected and all gamers were administered the POGQ. Those gamers who played at least sometimes in an online context were considered as “online gamers” and “offline gamers” were those who played videogames exclusively offline.
Results:
Confirmatory factor analysis supported the measurement invariance across online and offline videogame players. According to the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) model, online gamers were more likely to score higher on overuse, interpersonal conflict, and social isolation subscales of the POGQ.
Conclusion:
The results of the present study suggest that online and
offline gaming can be assessed using the same psychometric instrument. These findings open the possibility for future research studies concerning problematic video game to include participants who exclusively play either online or offline games, or both. However, the study also identified important structural features about how online and offline gaming might contribute differently to problematic use. These results provide important information and ideas that could be utilized in parental education and prevention program about the possible detrimental consequences of online vs. offline video game use.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse: Encompassing All Addictive Disorders
Creators: Smohai, M., Urbán, R., Griffiths, M.D., Király, O., Mirnics, Z., Vargha, A. and Demetrovics, Z.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Date: 2017
Volume: 43
Number: 1
ISSN: 0095-2990
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/00952990.2016.1240798DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 04 Nov 2016 16:42
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2017 15:09
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/29039

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