Effect of varying the concentrations of carbohydrate and milk protein in rehydration solutions ingested after exercise in the heat

James, L.J., Evans, G.H., Madin, J., Scott, D., Stepney, M., Harris, R., Stone, R. and Clayton, D.J. ORCID: 0000-0001-5481-0891, 2013. Effect of varying the concentrations of carbohydrate and milk protein in rehydration solutions ingested after exercise in the heat. British Journal of Nutrition, 110 (7), pp. 1285-1291. ISSN 0007-1145

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Abstract

The present study investigated the relationship between the milk protein content of a rehydration solution and fluid balance after exercise-induced dehydration. On three occasions, eight healthy males were dehydrated to an identical degree of body mass loss (BML, approximately 1.8 %) by intermittent cycling in the heat, rehydrating with 150 % of their BML over 1 h with either a 60 g/l carbohydrate solution (C), a 40 g/l carbohydrate, 20 g/l milk protein solution (CP20) or a 20 g/l carbohydrate, 40 g/l milk protein solution (CP40). Urine samples were collected pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and for a further 4 h. Subjects produced less urine after ingesting the CP20 or CP40 drink compared with the C drink (P<0.01), and at the end of the study, more of the CP20 (59 (SD 12) %) and CP40 (64 (SD 6) %) drinks had been retained compared with the C drink (46 (SD 9) %) (P,0.01). At the end of the study, whole-body net fluid balance was more negative for trial C (2470 (SD 154) ml) compared with both trials CP20 (2181 (SD 280) ml) and CP40 (2107 (SD 126) ml) (P<0.01). At 2 and 3 h after drink ingestion, urine osmolality was greater for trials CP20 and CP40 compared with trial C (P<0.05). The present study further demonstrates that after exercise-induced dehydration, a carbohydrate–milk protein solution is better retained than a carbohydrate solution. The results also suggest that high concentrations of milk protein are not more beneficial in terms of fluid retention than low concentrations of milk protein following exercise-induced dehydration.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: British Journal of Nutrition
Creators: James, L.J., Evans, G.H., Madin, J., Scott, D., Stepney, M., Harris, R., Stone, R. and Clayton, D.J.
Date: 31 May 2013
Volume: 110
Number: 7
ISSN: 0007-1145
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1017/S0007114513000536DOI
S0007114513000536Publisher Item Identifier
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 24 Oct 2017 08:38
Last Modified: 24 Oct 2017 08:38
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/31857

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