Electrophysiological study of the violence inhibition mechanism in relation to callous-unemotional and aggressive traits

Fido, D., Santo, M., Bloxsom, C., Gregson, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-3205-6821 and Sumich, A. ORCID: 0000-0003-4333-8442, 2017. Electrophysiological study of the violence inhibition mechanism in relation to callous-unemotional and aggressive traits. Personality and Individual Differences, 118, pp. 44-49. ISSN 0191-8869

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Abstract

The violence inhibition mechanism (VIM) proposes that observing another's distress inhibits responses that can lead to violent behaviour. Dysfunction of this system is associated with disorders characterised by aggressive and callous-unemotional traits, such as psychopathy. This study examines electrophysiological indices of face processing and motor extinction, in the context of aggressive and callous-unemotional traits. Fifty-four participants completed the inventory of callous and unemotional traits, the aggression questionnaire, and a Facial Affect Stop-Go task whereby facial distress was used as stop signals. Uncaring traits inversely associated with N170 amplitude across all facial expressions and aggressive traits inversely associated with Stop-P300 amplitude to facial distress. The N170 and Stop-P300 might provide useful electrophysiological markers for deficits across face processing and motor extinction stages of the VIM, respectively.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Personality and Individual Differences
Creators: Fido, D., Santo, M., Bloxsom, C., Gregson, M. and Sumich, A.
Publisher: Elsevier
Date: November 2017
Volume: 118
ISSN: 0191-8869
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.paid.2017.01.049DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 30 Oct 2017 11:15
Last Modified: 24 Jan 2018 15:32
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/31912

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