Ten myths about work addiction

Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, Demetrovics, Z. and Atroszko, P.A., 2018. Ten myths about work addiction. Journal of Behavioral Addictions. ISSN 2062-5871

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Abstract

Research into work addiction has steadily grown over the past decade. However, the literature is far from unified and there has been much debate on many different issues. Aim and methods: This paper comprises a narrative review and focuses on 10 myths about work addiction that have permeated the psychological literature and beyond. The 10 myths examined are (a) work addiction is a new behavioral addiction, (b) work addiction is similar to other behavioral addictions, (c) there are only psychosocial consequences of work addiction, (d) work addiction and workaholism are the same thing, (e) work addiction exclusively occurs as a consequence of individual personality factors, (f) work addiction only occurs in adulthood, (g) some types of work addiction are positive, (h) work addiction is a transient behavioral pattern related to situational factors, (i) work addiction is a function of the time spent engaging in work, and (j) work addiction is an example of overpathogizing everyday behavior and it will never be classed as a mental disorder in the DSM. Results: Using the empirical literature to date, it is demonstrated that there is evidence to counter each of the 10 myths. Conclusion: It appears that the field is far from unified and that there are different theoretical constructs underpinning different strands of research.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Creators: Griffiths, M.D., Demetrovics, Z. and Atroszko, P.A.
Publisher: Akadémiai Kiadó
Date: 7 February 2018
ISSN: 2062-5871
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1556/2006.7.2018.05DOI
Rights: © 2018 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 09 Feb 2018 15:58
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2018 15:58
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/32661

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