A pilot randomized controlled trial for a videoconference-delivered mindfulness-based group intervention in a nonclinical setting

Krägeloh, C.U., Medvedev, O.N., Taylor, T., Wrapson, W., Rix, G., Sumich, A. ORCID: 0000-0003-4333-8442, Wang, G.Y., Csako, R., Anstiss, D., Ranta, J.T., Patel, N. and Siegert, R.J., 2018. A pilot randomized controlled trial for a videoconference-delivered mindfulness-based group intervention in a nonclinical setting. Mindfulness, 10 (4), pp. 700-711. ISSN 1868-8527

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Abstract

Technology is increasingly being integrated into the provision of therapy and mental health interventions. While the evidence base for technology-led delivery of mindfulness-based interventions is growing, one approach to understanding the effects of technology-delivered elements includes so-named blended programs that continue to include aspects of traditional face-to-face interaction. This arrangement offers unique practical advantages, and also enables researchers to isolate variables that may be underlying the effects of technology-delivered interventions. The present study reports on a pilot videoconference-delivered mindfulness-based group intervention offered to university students and staff members with wait-list controls. Apart from the first session of the six-week course, the main facilitator guided evening classes remotely via online videoconferencing, with follow-up exercises via email. Participants Powered by Editorial Manager® and ProduXion Manager® from Aries Systems Corporation were taught a variety of mindfulness-based exercises such as meditation, breathing exercises, mindful tasting, as well as the concepts underpinning such practice. Participants completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires on depression, anxiety, repetitive negative thinking, dysfunctional attitudes, positive and negative affect, self-compassion, compassion for others, and mindfulness. For participants who attended at least five of the six sessions, scores on all outcome measures improved significantly post intervention and remained stable at three-week follow up. The videoconference-delivered mindfulness-based group intervention appears to provide a viable alternative format to standard mindfulness programs where the facilitator and participants need to live in close physical proximity with each other.

Item Type: Journal article
Alternative Title: Videoconference-delivered mindfulness-based group intervention [running head]
Publication Title: Mindfulness
Creators: Krägeloh, C.U., Medvedev, O.N., Taylor, T., Wrapson, W., Rix, G., Sumich, A., Wang, G.Y., Csako, R., Anstiss, D., Ranta, J.T., Patel, N. and Siegert, R.J.
Publisher: Springer
Date: 31 August 2018
Volume: 10
Number: 4
ISSN: 1868-8527
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/s12671-018-1024-yDOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 13 Jun 2018 08:49
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2019 10:59
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/33848

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