Ontological addiction theory: attachment to me, mine, and I

Van Gordon, W. ORCID: 0000-0002-5648-3043, Shonin, E., Diouri, S., Garcia-Campayo, J., Kotera, Y. and Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, 2018. Ontological addiction theory: attachment to me, mine, and I. Journal of Behavioral Addictions. ISSN 2062-5871

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Abstract

Background: Ontological addiction theory (OAT) is a novel metaphysical model of psychopathology and posits that human beings are prone to forming implausible beliefs concerning the way they think they exist, and that these beliefs can become addictive leading to functional impairments and mental illness. The theoretical underpinnings of OAT derive from the Buddhist philosophical perspective that all phenomena, including the self, do not manifest inherently or independently.

Aims and methods: This paper outlines the theoretical foundations of OAT along with indicative supportive empirical evidence from studies evaluating meditation awareness training as well as studies investigating non-attachment, emptiness, compassion, and loving-kindness.

Results: OAT provides a novel perspective on addiction, the factors that underlie mental illness, and how beliefs concerning selfhood are shaped and reified.

Conclusion: In addition to continuing to test the underlying assumptions of OAT, future empirical research needs to determine how ontological addiction fits with extant theories of self, reality, and suffering, as well with more established models of addiction.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Creators: Van Gordon, W., Shonin, E., Diouri, S., Garcia-Campayo, J., Kotera, Y. and Griffiths, M.D.
Publisher: Akadémiai Kiadó
Date: 12 June 2018
ISSN: 2062-5871
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1556/2006.7.2018.45DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 14 Jun 2018 08:33
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2018 08:33
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/33853

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