Early risk factors for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress after hospital admission for unintentional injury: multicentre cohort study

Kendrick, D., Baker, R., Hill, T., Beckett, K., Coupland, C., Kellezi, B. ORCID: 0000-0003-4825-3624, Joseph, S., Barnes, J., Sleney, J., Christie, N. and Morriss, R., 2018. Early risk factors for depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress after hospital admission for unintentional injury: multicentre cohort study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 112, pp. 15-24. ISSN 0022-3999

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Abstract

Objective: To quantify psychological morbidity and identify baseline factors associated with depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress symptoms up to 12 months post-injury. Methods: Multicentre cohort study of 668 adults, aged 16 to 70, admitted to 4 UK NHS hospital trusts. Data on injury, socio-demographic characteristics and health status was collected at recruitment. Depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress were measured at 1, 2, 4 and 12 months post-injury. Multilevel linear regression assessed associations between patient and injury characteristics and psychological outcomes over 12 months follow-up. Results: Depression, anxiety and post-traumatic distress scores were highest 1 month post-injury, and remained above baseline at 2, 4 and 12 months post-injury. Moderate or severe injuries, previous psychiatric diagnoses, higher pre-injury depression and anxiety scores, middle age (45–64 years), greater deprivation and lower pre-injury quality of life (QoL) were associated with higher depression scores post-injury. Previous psychiatric diagnoses, higher pre-injury depression and anxiety scores, middle age, greater deprivation and lower pre-injury QoL were associated with higher anxiety scores post-injury. Traffic injuries or injuries from being struck by objects, multiple injures (≥3), being female, previous psychiatric diagnoses, higher pre-injury anxiety scores and greater deprivation were associated with higher posttraumatic distress scores post-injury. Conclusion: A range of risk factors, identifiable shortly after injury, are associated with psychological morbidity occurring up to 12 months post-injury in a general trauma population. Further research is required to explore the utility of these, and other risk factors in predicting psychological morbidity on an individual patient basis.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Psychosomatic Research
Creators: Kendrick, D., Baker, R., Hill, T., Beckett, K., Coupland, C., Kellezi, B., Joseph, S., Barnes, J., Sleney, J., Christie, N. and Morriss, R.
Publisher: Elsevier
Date: September 2018
Volume: 112
ISSN: 0022-3999
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.jpsychores.2018.06.008DOI
S0022399917312254Publisher Item Identifier
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 15 Jun 2018 09:39
Last Modified: 16 Aug 2018 10:27
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/33859

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