Akkermansia muciniphila and improved metabolic health during a dietary intervention in obesity: relationship with gut microbiome richness and ecology

Dao, M.C., Everard, A., Aron-Wisnewsky, J., Sokolovska, N., Prifti, E., Verger, E.O., Kayser, B.D., Levenez, F., Chilloux, J., Hoyles, L. ORCID: 0000-0002-6418-342X, MICRO-Obes Consortium, , Dumas, M.-E., Rizkalla, S.W., Dore, J., Cani, P.D. and Clément, K., 2016. Akkermansia muciniphila and improved metabolic health during a dietary intervention in obesity: relationship with gut microbiome richness and ecology. Gut, 65 (3), pp. 426-436. ISSN 0017-5749

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Abstract

Objective: Individuals with obesity and type 2 diabetes differ from lean and healthy individuals in their abundance of certain gut microbial species and microbial gene richness. Abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, a mucin degrading bacterium, has been inversely associated with body fat mass and glucose intolerance in mice, but more evidence is needed in humans. The impact of diet and weight loss on this bacterial species is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the association between fecal A. muciniphila abundance, fecal microbiome gene richness, diet, host characteristics, and their changes after calorie restriction (CR).
Design: The intervention consisted of a 6 week CR period followed by a 6 week weight stabilization (WS) diet in overweight and obese adults (N=49, including 41 women). Fecal A. muciniphila abundance, fecal microbial gene richness, diet and bioclinical parameters were measured at baseline and after CR and WS.
Results: At baseline A. muciniphila was inversely related to fasting glucose, waist to hip ratio, and subcutaneous adipocyte diameter. Subjects with higher gene richness and A. muciniphila abundance exhibited the healthiest metabolic status, particularly in fasting plasma glucose, plasma triglycerides and body fat distribution. Individuals with higher baseline A. muciniphila displayed greater improvement in insulin sensitivity markers and other clinical parameters after CR. These participants also experienced a reduction in A. muciniphila abundance, but it remained significantly higher than in individuals with lower baseline abundance. A. muciniphila was associated with microbial species known to be related to health.
Conclusion: A. muciniphila is associated with a healthier metabolic status and better clinical outcomes after CR in overweight/obese adults. The interaction between gut microbiota ecology and A. muciniphila warrants further investigation.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Gut
Creators: Dao, M.C., Everard, A., Aron-Wisnewsky, J., Sokolovska, N., Prifti, E., Verger, E.O., Kayser, B.D., Levenez, F., Chilloux, J., Hoyles, L., MICRO-Obes Consortium, , Dumas, M.-E., Rizkalla, S.W., Dore, J., Cani, P.D. and Clément, K.
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd. on behalf of the British Society of Gastroenterology
Date: March 2016
Volume: 65
Number: 3
ISSN: 0017-5749
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1136/gutjnl-2014-308778DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 10 Aug 2018 09:11
Last Modified: 10 Aug 2018 09:11
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/34310

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