Therianthropy: well-being, schizotypy and autism in individuals who self- identify as non-human

Clegg, H., Collings, R. and Roxburgh, E.C. ORCID: 0000-0002-8086-9501, 2019. Therianthropy: well-being, schizotypy and autism in individuals who self- identify as non-human. Society & Animals, 27 (4), pp. 403-426. ISSN 1063-1119

[img] Text
12131_1131a_Roxburgh.pdf - Post-print
Full-text access embargoed until 28 August 2021.

Download (653kB)

Abstract

Therianthropy is the belief that one is at least part non-human animal. This study aimed to address the dichotomization surrounding therianthropy in relation to mental health and wellbeing. One hundred and twelve therians and 265 non-therians completed Ryff's Scales of Psychological Wellbeing, the O-LIFE questionnaire, and the Autism Spectrum Quotient. Results found that therians scored lower on variables that are associated with positive social relationships. Such findings may be explained by cognitive factors and/or social factors that are associated with the stigmatization of cross species identities. However being a therian moderated the relationship between both autism and introverted anhedonia in relation to autonomy. Thus a therian identity may act as a protective factor for those experiencing higher levels of autism and schizotypy.

Item Type: Journal article
Alternative Title: Therianthropy and mental health [running title]
Publication Title: Society & Animals
Creators: Clegg, H., Collings, R. and Roxburgh, E.C.
Publisher: Brill
Date: 28 August 2019
Volume: 27
Number: 4
ISSN: 1063-1119
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1163/15685306-12341540DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 08 Oct 2018 13:22
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2020 10:40
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/34612

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year