Conceptualising behavioural ambidexterity and the effects on individual well-being

Räisänen, C. and Raidén, A. ORCID: 0000-0001-7176-1139, 2018. Conceptualising behavioural ambidexterity and the effects on individual well-being. In: C. Gorse and C.J. Neilson, eds., Proceedings 34th Annual ARCOM Conference, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 3-5 September 2018. Sheffield: Association of Researchers in Construction Management, pp. 736-745.

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Abstract

'Knowledge work' in the contemporary business landscape typically demands behavioural ambidexterity: the ability to simultaneously demonstrate creativity and compliance. However, the effects of behavioural ambidexterity on the well-being of individual employees are not well known. We examine the relations between work design, behavioural ambidexterity and perceptions of well-being, conceptually drawing on a review of the three strands of literature. Our focus is on well-being, after a well-established holistic definition based on healthcare, philosophy, psychology and sociology literatures, which have converged on three core dimensions of well-being: psychological (happiness), physical (health) and social (relationships). We highlight the influence of personal circumstances and the role of agency in work design as two key antecedents of well-being outcomes, and suggest a preliminary framework for further studies of behavioural ambidexterity and well-being in the construction industry.

Item Type: Chapter in book
Creators: Räisänen, C. and Raidén, A.
Publisher: Association of Researchers in Construction Management
Place of Publication: Sheffield
Date: September 2018
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Depositing User: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 26 Nov 2018 10:26
Last Modified: 26 Nov 2018 10:26
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/35122

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