Comparing early adolescents’ positive bystander responses to cyberbullying and traditional bullying: the impact of severity and gender

Macaulay, P.J.R. ORCID: 0000-0003-4891-9940, Boulton, M.J. and Betts, L.R. ORCID: 0000-0002-6147-8089, 2019. Comparing early adolescents’ positive bystander responses to cyberbullying and traditional bullying: the impact of severity and gender. Journal of Technology in Behavioural Science, 4 (3), pp. 253-261. ISSN 2366-5963

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Abstract

Young people are frequently exposed to bullying events in the offline and online domain. Witnesses to these incidents act as bystanders and play a pivotal role in reducing or encouraging bullying behaviour. The present study examined 868 (47.2% female) 11-13-year-old early adolescent pupils’ bystander responses across a series of hypothetical vignettes based on traditional and cyberbullying events. The vignettes experimentally controlled for severity across mild, moderate, and severe scenarios. The findings showed positive bystander responses (PBRs) were higher in cyberbullying than traditional bullying incidents. Bullying severity impacted on PBRs, in that PBRs increased across mild, moderate, and severe incidents, consistent across traditional and cyberbullying. Females exhibited more PBRs across both types of bullying. Findings are discussed in relation to practical applications within the school. Strategies to encourage PBRs to all forms of bullying should be at the forefront of bullying intervention methods.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Technology in Behavioural Science
Creators: Macaulay, P.J.R., Boulton, M.J. and Betts, L.R.
Publisher: Springer
Date: September 2019
Volume: 4
Number: 3
ISSN: 2366-5963
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/s41347-018-0082-2DOI
Rights: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 18 Dec 2018 09:49
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2019 15:58
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/35365

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