Discovery awareness for staff supporting individuals with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour: is it helpful and does it increase self-efficacy?

Thompson, B., Tickle, A. and Dillon, G. ORCID: 0000-0002-3934-3815, 2019. Discovery awareness for staff supporting individuals with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour: is it helpful and does it increase self-efficacy? International Journal of Developmental Disabilities. ISSN 2047-3869

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Abstract

Objectives: Discovery Awareness (DA) is an approach to using video within structured meetings to help staff become more mindful, aware and interested in a client they are supporting who has intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. The objective was to evaluate whether, and how, DA is helpful for staff in both inpatient and community settings, and whether it increases self-efficacy in working with people with challenging behaviour.

Methods: A two-phase mixed method design was employed. For phase one, forty staff who took part in one of seven single DA meetings completed the Challenging Behaviour Self-Efficacy Scale pre- and post- DA. In addition, post- DA, participants completed an Adapted Helpful Aspects of Therapy Scale (AHAT). For phase two, six participants completed a follow-up Change Interview; three to 12 weeks after DA.

Results: Descriptive statistics reveal participants found events in the DA ‘greatly helpful’. The changes identified varied in whether they were expected or not, but were unlikely to occur without DA and ‘very important’. Statistical analysis showed no significant changes in self-efficacy following the DA. A thematic analysis on the qualitative data generated by the change interviews and AHAT identified three main themes: Impact on interaction; DA is unique and valuable; and The power of the process. The latter had three subthemes: a structure to facilitate change, making use of the content and reflective space to promote learning.

Conclusion: Attendance at a single DA meeting does not increase staff perceptions of self-efficacy, however, staff find the process of DA helpful as it encourages reflection on their interactions with individuals with ID and challenging behaviour and attuning of their interactions, though further research is needed.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of Developmental Disabilities
Creators: Thompson, B., Tickle, A. and Dillon, G.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis on behalf of the British Society of Developmental Disabilities
Date: 20 April 2019
ISSN: 2047-3869
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/20473869.2019.1599605DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 25 Mar 2019 13:59
Last Modified: 29 Apr 2019 09:57
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/36140

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