Self-harming behaviors in prison: a comparison of suicidal processes, self-injurious behaviors, and mixed events

Smith, H.P., Kaminski, R.J., Power, J. and Slade, K. ORCID: 0000-0002-7442-4805, 2019. Self-harming behaviors in prison: a comparison of suicidal processes, self-injurious behaviors, and mixed events. Criminal Justice Studies: a Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society, 32 (3), pp. 264-286. ISSN 1478-601X

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Abstract

Self-harming behaviors occurring in prison disproportionately consume resources and cause considerable disruption. To date, theoretical paradigms have explained self-injurious behaviors and suicidal processes either via a continuum or dichotomy of self-harm. This current study examines all documented acts of self-harm (n=1,158) occurring in South Carolina's 28 prisons over a 50 month period. We test and find support for a tripartite schema of self-harm; differentiated with regard to suicidal processes, self-injurious behaviors, and a 'mixed group' of self-harming behaviors. These groups of behaviors were distinct with regard to situational variables (i.e. body part targeted, injury severity) as well as institutional responses (i.e., medical treatment needed, employment of suicide protocols). Findings indicate that self-injurious behaviors are likely to result in physical injury and/or hospitalizations.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Criminal Justice Studies: a Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society
Creators: Smith, H.P., Kaminski, R.J., Power, J. and Slade, K.
Publisher: Routledge
Date: 25 April 2019
Volume: 32
Number: 3
ISSN: 1478-601X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/1478601X.2019.1602044DOI
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 09 Apr 2019 12:40
Last Modified: 23 Sep 2019 13:42
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/36215

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