Testing the influence of habitat experienced during the natal phase on habitat selection later in life in Scandinavian wolves

Milleret, C., Ordiz, A., Sanz-Pérez, A., Uzal, A. ORCID: 0000-0001-6478-1895, Carricondo-Sanchez, D., Eriksen, A., Sand, H., Wabakken, P., Wikenros, C., Åkesson, M. and Zimmermann, B., 2019. Testing the influence of habitat experienced during the natal phase on habitat selection later in life in Scandinavian wolves. Scientific Reports, 9 (1): 6526. ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

Natal habitat preference induction (NHPI) occurs when characteristics of the natal habitat influence the future habitat selection of an animal. However, the influence of NHPI after the dispersal phase has received remarkably little attention. We tested whether exposure to humans in the natal habitat helps understand why some adult wolves Canis lupus may approach human settlements more than other conspecifics, a question of both ecological and management interest. We quantified habitat selection patterns within home ranges using resource selection functions and GPS data from 21 wolf pairs in Scandinavia. We identified the natal territory of each wolf with genetic parental assignment, and we used human-related characteristics within the natal territory to estimate the degree of anthropogenic influence in the early life of each wolf. When the female of the adult wolf pair was born in an area with a high degree of anthropogenic influence, the wolf pair tended to select areas further away from humans, compared to wolf pairs from natal territories with a low degree of anthropogenic influence. Yet the pattern was statistically weak, we suggest that our methodological approach can be useful in other systems to better understand NHPI and to inform management about human-wildlife interactions.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Scientific Reports
Creators: Milleret, C., Ordiz, A., Sanz-Pérez, A., Uzal, A., Carricondo-Sanchez, D., Eriksen, A., Sand, H., Wabakken, P., Wikenros, C., Åkesson, M. and Zimmermann, B.
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Date: 25 April 2019
Volume: 9
Number: 1
ISSN: 2045-2322
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1038/s41598-019-42835-1DOI
42835Publisher Item Identifier
Rights: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Divisions: Schools > School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 26 Apr 2019 09:11
Last Modified: 26 Apr 2019 09:11
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/36353

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