The effects of repeated-sprint training on field-based fitness measures: a meta-analysis of controlled and non-controlled trials

Taylor, J., Macpherson, T., Spears, I. ORCID: 0000-0003-4982-2841 and Weston, M., 2015. The effects of repeated-sprint training on field-based fitness measures: a meta-analysis of controlled and non-controlled trials. Sports Medicine, 45 (6), pp. 881-891. ISSN 0112-1642

[img]
Preview
Text
14406_Spears.pdf - Post-print

Download (268kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Repeated-sprint training appears to be an efficient and practical means for the simultaneous development of different components of fitness relevant to team sports.

Objective: Our objective was to systematically review the literature and meta-analyse the effect of repeated-sprint training on a selection of field-based measures of athletic performance, i.e. counter-movement jump, 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint, 30 m sprint, repeated-sprint ability and high-intensity intermittent running performance.

Data Sources: The SPORTDiscus, PubMed, MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched for original research articles. Search terms included 'repeated-sprint training', 'sprint training', 'aerobic endurance', 'repeated-sprint ability', 'counter-movement jump' and 'sprint performance'.

Study Selection: Inclusion criteria included intervention consisting of a series of ≤10 s sprints with ≤60 s recovery; trained participants; intervention duration of 2–12 weeks; field-based fitness measures; running- or cycling-based intervention; published up to, and including, February 2014.

Data Extraction: Our final dataset included six trials for counter-movement jump (two controlled trials), eight trials for 10 m sprint, four trials for 20 m sprint (three controlled trials), two trials for 30 m sprint, eight trials for repeated-sprint ability and three trials for high-intensity intermittent running performance. Analyses were conducted using comprehensive meta-analysis software. Uncertainty in the meta-analysed effect of repeated-sprint training was expressed as 95 % confidence limits (CL), along with the probability that the true value of the effect was trivial, beneficial or harmful. Magnitude-based inferences were based on standardised thresholds for small, moderate and large changes of 0.2, 0.6 and 1.2 standard deviations, respectively.

Results: Repeated-sprint training had a likely small beneficial effect in non-controlled counter-movement jump trials (effect size 0.33; 95 % CL ±0.30), with a possibly moderate beneficial effect in controlled trials (0.63; 95 % CL ±0.44). There was a very likely small beneficial effect on 10 m sprint time in non-controlled trials (−0.42; 95 % CL ±0.24), with a possibly moderate beneficial effect on 20 m sprint time in non-controlled (−0.49; 95 % CL ±0.46) and controlled (−0.65; 95 % CL ±0.61) trials. Repeated-sprint training had a possibly large beneficial effect on 30 m sprint performance in non-controlled trials (−1.01; 95 % CL ±0.93), with possibly moderate beneficial effects on repeated-sprint ability (−0.62; 95 % CL ±0.25) and high-intensity intermittent running performance (−0.61; 95 % CL ±0.54).

Conclusions: Repeated-sprint training can induce small to large improvements in power, speed, repeated-sprint ability and endurance, and may have relevance for training in team sports.

Item Type: Journal article
Alternative Title: Effects of repeated-sprint training on fitness [running title]
Publication Title: Sports Medicine
Creators: Taylor, J., Macpherson, T., Spears, I. and Weston, M.
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
Date: June 2015
Volume: 45
Number: 6
ISSN: 0112-1642
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/s40279-015-0324-9DOI
324Publisher Item Identifier
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 12 Aug 2019 11:21
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2019 11:22
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/37226

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year