Modelling the invasion history of Sinanodonta woodiana in Europe: tracking the routes of a sedentary aquatic invader with mobile parasitic larvae

Konečný, A., Popa, O.P., Bartáková, V., Douda, K., Bryja, J., Smith, C. ORCID: 0000-0003-3285-0379, Popa, L.O. and Reichard, M., 2018. Modelling the invasion history of Sinanodonta woodiana in Europe: tracking the routes of a sedentary aquatic invader with mobile parasitic larvae. Evolutionary Applications, 11 (10), pp. 1975-1989. ISSN 1752-4571

[img]
Preview
Text
14416_Smith.pdf - Published version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Understanding the invasive potential of species outside their native range is one of the most pressing questions in applied evolutionary and ecological research. Admixture of genotypes of invasive species from multiple sources has been implicated in successful invasions, by generating novel genetic combinations that facilitate rapid adaptation to new environments. Alternatively, adaptive evolution on standing genetic variation, exposed by phenotypic plasticity and selected by genetic accommodation, can facilitate invasion success. We investigated the population genetic structure of an Asian freshwater mussel with a parasitic dispersal stage, Sinanodonta woodiana, which has been present in Europe since 1979 but which has expanded rapidly in the last decade. Data from a mitochondrial marker and nuclear microsatellites have suggested that all European populations of S. woodiana originate from the River Yangtze basin in China. Only a single haplotype was detected in Europe, in contrast to substantial mitochondrial diversity in native Asian populations. Analysis of microsatellite markers indicated intensive gene flow and confirmed a lower genetic diversity of European populations compared to those from the Yangtze basin, though that difference was not large. Using an Approximate Bayesian Modelling approach, we identified two areas as the probable source of the spread of S. woodiana in Europe, which matched historical records for its establishment. Their populations originated from a single colonization event. Our data do not support alternative explanations for the rapid recent spread of S. woodiana; recent arrival of a novel (cold‐tolerant) genotype or continuous propagule pressure. Instead, in situ adaptation, facilitated by repeated admixture, appears to drive the ongoing expansion of S. woodiana. We discuss management consequences of our results.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Evolutionary Applications
Creators: Konečný, A., Popa, O.P., Bartáková, V., Douda, K., Bryja, J., Smith, C., Popa, L.O. and Reichard, M.
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Date: December 2018
Volume: 11
Number: 10
ISSN: 1752-4571
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/eva.12700DOI
Rights: © 2018 The Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Divisions: Schools > School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 12 Aug 2019 14:39
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2019 14:39
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/37240

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year