The price of mobility

Weisser, R.A. ORCID: 0000-0002-1717-5697, 2019. The price of mobility. Review of Regional Research, 39 (1), pp. 25-64. ISSN 0173-7600

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Abstract

This paper addresses the question concerning the price of geographic mobility in various labour market and migration scenarios. Pivotal points are expected mobility premiums which are sufficient to tip the scales in favour of moving to a geographically distinct location. These premiums are first derived within a theoretical model, accounting not only for location-specific amenity levels or labour market conditions, but also for heterogeneous personality traits and preferences. Derived hypotheses demonstrate that—in presence of heterogeneous psychic costs or adjustment capabilities—expected mobility premiums can remain distinctly positive even in an unemployment scenario. Furthermore, adjustment capabilities are to a large extent related to earlier mobility experiences, implying that labour mobility is partially learnable.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Review of Regional Research
Creators: Weisser, R.A.
Publisher: Springer
Date: February 2019
Volume: 39
Number: 1
ISSN: 0173-7600
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/s10037-018-0126-2DOI
126Publisher Item Identifier
Rights: © The Author(s) 2018. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Business School
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 06 Sep 2019 10:32
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2019 10:32
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/37585

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