Examining the relationship between fitness-related self-conscious emotions, disordered eating symptoms, and morbid exercise behavior: an exploratory study

Alcaraz-Ibáñez, M., Sicilia, Á., Dumitru, D.C., Paterna, A. and Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, 2019. Examining the relationship between fitness-related self-conscious emotions, disordered eating symptoms, and morbid exercise behavior: an exploratory study. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 8 (3), pp. 603-612. ISSN 2062-5871

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Abstract

Background and aims: Theoretical models of morbid exercise behavior (MEB) suggest that it may emerge as a result of complex interactions between a range of psychosocial factors. However, in spite of fitness-related self-conscious emotions involving such factors, their relationship with the risk of MEB has never been investigated. Consequently, this study had two objectives. First, to explore the relationship that fitness-related self-conscious emotions have with (a) symptoms reflecting MEB as assessed by the Exercise Addiction Inventory (EAI) and the Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised (EDS-R) and (b) exercise frequency. Second, to examine whether these relationships might vary according to disordered eating symptoms.

Methods: A sample of 646 undergraduate students (59% males; Mage = 21.25; SDage = 2.94) completed a self-reported questionnaire.

Results: After controlling for age, sex, and disordered eating symptoms, it was found that shame, hubristic pride, and authentic pride positively explained MEB; for their part, guilt (negatively) and authentic pride (positively) explained exercise frequency. The positive relationships between pride and MEB were weaker (in the case of the hubristic facet) or stronger (in the case of the authentic facet) under higher levels of disordered eating symptoms. The independent variables explained 29% (EAI), 28% (EDS-R), and 27% (exercise frequency) of the variance in dependent variables.

Discussion: Tempering fitness-related emotions of shame, guilt, hubristic pride, and authentic pride may contribute to healthier exercise behavior.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Creators: Alcaraz-Ibáñez, M., Sicilia, Á., Dumitru, D.C., Paterna, A. and Griffiths, M.D.
Publisher: Akadémiai Kiadó
Date: September 2019
Volume: 8
Number: 3
ISSN: 2062-5871
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1556/2006.8.2019.43DOI
1119415Other
Rights: This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited, a link to the CC License is provided, and changes – if any – are indicated.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 25 Sep 2019 10:06
Last Modified: 24 Jan 2020 14:14
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/37765

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