Evolutionary traditions and corporate law: the effectiveness and development of liquidation duty in China

Wei, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-7466-3697, Zhao, J. ORCID: 0000-0001-6430-2356 and McCormack, G., 2020. Evolutionary traditions and corporate law: the effectiveness and development of liquidation duty in China. Asia Pacific Law Review, 27 (2), pp. 149-175. ISSN 1019-2557

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Abstract

This paper argues for updating and reform of the liquidation duty under Chinese corporate law. It adopts an evolutionary perspective on corporate law in the sense of asking whether the corporate laws co-evolve with, and adapt to the changing conditions of a country, rather than whether laws are converging towards a certain 'developed' model.

In some jurisdictions, directors have a creditor-regarding duty when the company is insolvent or near insolvency and this duty is intended to constrain 'moral hazard' issues on the part of corporate insiders. In China, such moral hazard issues are mitigated by the liquidation duty. This paper argues that while the liquidation duty is relatively effective, it has created unfairness and undermined the value of formal insolvency law. Drawing on the experience of other jurisdictions especially the UK in relation to wrongful trading law, this paper suggests that a wrongful trading remedy and further restructuring measures might be introduced in China.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Asia Pacific Law Review
Creators: Wei, C., Zhao, J. and McCormack, G.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Date: 3 March 2020
Volume: 27
Number: 2
ISSN: 1019-2557
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/10192557.2019.1708009DOI
1205306Other
Divisions: Schools > Nottingham Law School
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 10 Dec 2019 09:11
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2020 13:49
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/38840

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