Materials-based approach for interrogating human prostate cancer cell adhesion and migratory potential using a fluoroalkylsilica culture surface

Nicklin, M., Hickman, G.J., Pockley, A.G. ORCID: 0000-0001-9593-6431 and Perry, C.C. ORCID: 0000-0003-1517-468X, 2020. Materials-based approach for interrogating human prostate cancer cell adhesion and migratory potential using a fluoroalkylsilica culture surface. ACS Applied Bio Materials. ISSN 2576-6422

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Abstract

OPCT-1 is a heterogeneous prostate cancer cell line derived from primary (rather than metastatic) disease which contains epithelial, mesenchymal, and CD44 high/CD24 low cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations and from which we have previously generated and characterized stable mesenchymal (P4B6B) and epithelial (P5B3) cell subpopulations. In this contribution, we explore the effect of tissue culture surface chemistry (standard tissue culture plastic (TCP) and a fluoroalkylsilica (FS) culture surface with inherently low surface energy) on the phenotype and adherent capacity of mesenchymal and epithelial cell populations. We demonstrate that OPCT-1 cells adherent to FS surfaces comprise both epithelial- and mesenchymal-like populations; a mesenchymal subpopulation derived from OPCT1 (P4B6B) poorly adheres to FS and formed spheroids, whereas an epithelial subpopulation derived from OPCT1 (P5B3) forms an adherent monolayer. In contrast, P4B6B cells do adhere to FS when cocultured with P5B3 cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that EMT/cell differentiation status dictates cell adhesive capacity and provide a novel insight into the relationship between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations in metastasis. Importantly, the differences in adherence capacity between P4B6B and P5B3 are not apparent using standard TCP-based culture, thereby highlighting the value of using alternative culture surfaces for studying cell surface interaction/adhesion phenomena and interrogating mechanisms involved in adhesion and detachment of metastatic tumor cells.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: ACS Applied Bio Materials
Creators: Nicklin, M., Hickman, G.J., Pockley, A.G. and Perry, C.C.
Publisher: American Chemical Society (ACS)
Date: 7 January 2020
ISSN: 2576-6422
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1021/acsabm.9b00940DOI
1265207Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 14 Jan 2020 14:19
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2020 10:41
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/38974

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