Viscous placebo and carbohydrate breakfasts similarly decrease appetite and increase resistance exercise performance compared to a control breakfast in trained males

Naharudin, M.N., Adams, J., Richardson, H., Thomson, T., Oxinou, C., Marshall, C., Clayton, D.J. ORCID: 0000-0001-5481-0891, Mears, S.A., Yusof, A., Hulston, C.J. and James, L.J., 2020. Viscous placebo and carbohydrate breakfasts similarly decrease appetite and increase resistance exercise performance compared to a control breakfast in trained males. British Journal of Nutrition. ISSN 0007-1145

[img]
Preview
Text
1312538_Clayton.pdf - Post-print

Download (714kB) | Preview

Abstract

Given the common view that pre-exercise nutrition/breakfast is important for performance, the present study investigated whether breakfast influences resistance exercise performance via a physiological or psychological effect. Twenty-two resistance trained, breakfast-consuming men completed three experimental trials, consuming water-only (WAT), or semi-solid breakfasts containing 0 g/kg (PLA) or 1.5 g/kg (CHO) maltodextrin. PLA and CHO meals contained xanthan gum and low-energy flavouring (~29 kcal) and subjects were told both ‘contained energy’. Two hours post-meal, subjects completed 4 sets of back squat and bench press to failure at 90% 10 repetition maximum. Blood samples were taken pre-meal, 45 min and 105 min post-meal to measure serum/plasma glucose, insulin, ghrelin, GLP-1 and PYY concentrations. Subjective hunger/fullness were also measured. Total back squat repetitions were greater in CHO (44 (SD 10) repetitions) and PLA (43 ± 10 repetitions) than WAT (38 (SD 10) repetitions; P < 0.001). Total bench press repetitions were similar between trials (WAT 37 (SD 7) repetitions; CHO 39 ± 7 repetitions; PLA 38 (SD 7) repetitions; P = 0.130). Performance was similar between CHO and PLA trials. Hunger was suppressed and fullness increased similarly in PLA and CHO, relative to WAT (P < 0.001). During CHO, plasma glucose was elevated at 45 min (P < 0.05), whilst serum insulin was elevated (P < 0.05) and plasma ghrelin supressed at 45 and 105 min (P < 0.05). These results suggest that breakfast/pre-exercise nutrition enhances resistance exercise performance via a psychological effect, although a potential mediating role of hunger cannot be discounted.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: British Journal of Nutrition
Creators: Naharudin, M.N., Adams, J., Richardson, H., Thomson, T., Oxinou, C., Marshall, C., Clayton, D.J., Mears, S.A., Yusof, A., Hulston, C.J. and James, L.J.
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Date: March 2020
ISSN: 0007-1145
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1017/s0007114520001002DOI
1312538Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 31 Mar 2020 08:01
Last Modified: 31 Mar 2020 08:01
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/39521

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year