The roles of socioeconomic status, occupational health and job rank on the epidemiology of different psychiatric smptoms in a sample of UK workers

Lopes, B., Kamau, C. and Jaspal, R. ORCID: 0000-0002-8463-9519, 2019. The roles of socioeconomic status, occupational health and job rank on the epidemiology of different psychiatric smptoms in a sample of UK workers. Community Mental Health Journal, 55 (2), pp. 336-349. ISSN 0010-3853

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Abstract

There is a considerable gap in epidemiological literature about community mental health showing how psychiatric symptoms are associated with job rank, socioeconomic status, and occupational health. We examine data from 4596 employees collected in the United Kingdom's Psychiatric Morbidity among Adults Living in Private Households Survey. There were 939 workers in managerial jobs, 739 in supervisory jobs and 2918 employees in lower ranking jobs. Of the 4596 workers, 2463 had depressive symptoms and 2133 no depressive symptoms. Job rank, household gross income, social class, personal gross income and socio-economic group were significantly associated with general health, occupational health and depressive and avoidant symptoms. Job rank, occupational and physical health also explained the variance in paranoid and avoidant symptoms among the employees. This study shows that severe psychopathology is related to workers' job rank.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Community Mental Health Journal
Creators: Lopes, B., Kamau, C. and Jaspal, R.
Publisher: Springer
Date: February 2019
Volume: 55
Number: 2
ISSN: 0010-3853
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1007/s10597-018-0259-3DOI
1313650Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 06 Apr 2020 09:58
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2020 09:58
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/39564

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