'I never faced up to being gay': sexual, religious and ethnic identities among British Indian and British Pakistani gay men

Jaspal, R. ORCID: 0000-0002-8463-9519, 2012. 'I never faced up to being gay': sexual, religious and ethnic identities among British Indian and British Pakistani gay men. Culture, Health & Sexuality, 14 (7), pp. 767-780. ISSN 1369-1058

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Abstract

This paper presents the findings from a comparative qualitative study of British Indian and British Pakistani gay men, all of whom self-identified as members of their religious communities. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and identity process theory. Results suggest that the intersection between sexuality and religion is more relevant to British Pakistani participants, while the intersection between sexuality and ethnicity is more relevant to British Indian participants. For British Indian participants in particular, homosexuality seems to be socially problematic, posing potential obstacles for interpersonal and intergroup relations. Conversely, for British Pakistanis, homosexuality is both socially and psychologically problematic, affecting intrapsychic as well as interpersonal levels of human interdependence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Culture, Health & Sexuality
Creators: Jaspal, R.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Date: August 2012
Volume: 14
Number: 7
ISSN: 1369-1058
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/13691058.2012.693626DOI
1315865Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 17 Apr 2020 08:04
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2020 08:04
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/39665

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