Validating an adapted questionnaire to measure belongingness of medical students in clinical settings

Qureshi, A., Fino, E. ORCID: 0000-0002-5095-6014, Vivekananda-Schmidt, P. and Sandars, J., 2019. Validating an adapted questionnaire to measure belongingness of medical students in clinical settings. Cogent Medicine, 6 (1). ISSN 2331-205X

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Abstract

Introduction: Belongingness is a key factor that influences learner development and wellbeing, but no previous research has been performed to evaluate perceived belongingness in medical students whilst on their placements.

Method: The Belongingness Scale-Clinical Placement Experience (BES-CPE) for nursing students was adapted for use with medical students. Following a face validity assessment, 490 undergraduate medical students in years three to five at a UK university were invited to participate and 302 completed the adapted questionnaire. The factor structure was explored using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) with Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha.

Results: A three-component structure was identified (Esteem, Connectedness, and Efficacy), which was aligned to the original theoretical model underpinning the scale, and the instrument had high internal consistency. Four items were discarded and the final adapted version had a total of 30.

Conclusions: The adapted BES-CPE instrument for medical students in our sample of UK undergraduate medical students had an appropriate factor structure and high internal consistency. This context-specific instrument can be used for future research as a valid instrument to measure the role of belongingness in medical education and to support developing belongingness in medical students during clinical placements.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Cogent Medicine
Creators: Qureshi, A., Fino, E., Vivekananda-Schmidt, P. and Sandars, J.
Publisher: Cogent OA
Date: 17 May 2019
Volume: 6
Number: 1
ISSN: 2331-205X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/2331205x.2019.1620087DOI
1323886Other
Rights: © 2019 The Author(s). This open access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 license. You are free to: Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format. Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms. Under the following terms: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. No additional restrictions You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Depositing User: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 13 May 2020 11:10
Last Modified: 25 Jun 2020 15:25
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/39831

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