Discovering the Emotional Intelligence exhibited by primary school teachers while delivering Physical Education in the United Kingdom

Strong, C. ORCID: 0000-0001-6003-5123, Hindley, D. ORCID: 0000-0003-2279-9530, Sarkar, M. ORCID: 0000-0002-8338-8500 and Nevill, M. ORCID: 0000-0003-2498-9493, 2020. Discovering the Emotional Intelligence exhibited by primary school teachers while delivering Physical Education in the United Kingdom. International Journal of Emotional Education, 12 (1), pp. 88-94. ISSN 2073-7629

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Abstract

It has been stated that Emotional Intelligence (E.I) is an integral part of a teacher's skill set (Corcoran and Tormey, 2013) and consequently teachers displaying a high Emotional Quotient (E.Q) produce more enthusiastic and motivating P.E lessons (Akhmetovaa, Kima and Harnischb, 2014). Therefore, it is important to understand how to utilise certain facets of E.I while delivering primary P.E to varying age groups.

Previous studies measuring teachers E.I has mainly concentrated classroom environments or measuring P.E teacher’s E.Q (Hen and Sharabi-Nov, 2014; Sutton and Wheatley, 2003; Al-Zaid and Al-Khayat, 2016; Klemola, Heikinaro-Johansson and O'Sullivan, 2013), though little research has been investigated on the emotional competencies that are displayed by teachers while delivering primary P.E.

This study classified the most displayed facets of E.I by teachers while delivering primary P.E. to different key stages. The study was conducted with seventeen primary school teachers participating (7 males and 10 females). The data was collected via overt observations, self-reflective journals and semi structured interviews. The results highlighted the four most displayed facets of E.I in each key stage from a possible twenty. Interestingly, four varying facets of emotions were displayed for each of the three key stages, stating that different emotional skills are required when teaching different age groups.

Furthermore, all teachers stated that working on their E.I provided a positive reflection on their own delivery in P.E. This study suggests that teaching different age groups require varied facets of emotions to deliver successful P.E lessons.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of Emotional Education
Creators: Strong, C., Hindley, D., Sarkar, M. and Nevill, M.
Publisher: Centre for Resilience and Socio-Emotional Health, University of Malta
Date: April 2020
Volume: 12
Number: 1
ISSN: 2073-7629
Identifiers:
NumberType
1324239Other
Rights: © 2020 CRES. Open access journal.
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Depositing User: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 01 Jul 2020 09:08
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2020 09:08
Related URLs:
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/40146

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