Mild-to-moderate schizotypal traits relate to physiological arousal from social stress

Premkumar, P. ORCID: 0000-0003-1934-6741, Alahakoon, P., Smith, M., Kumari, V., Babu, D. and Baker, J., 2020. Mild-to-moderate schizotypal traits relate to physiological arousal from social stress. Stress. ISSN 1025-3890

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Abstract

Schizotypy denotes psychosis-like experiences, such as perceptual aberration, magical ideation and social anxiety. Altered physiological arousal from social stress is found in people with high schizotypal traits. Two experiments aimed to determine the relationship of schizotypy to physiological arousal from social stress. Experiment 1 tested the hypotheses that heart rate from social stress would be greater in high, than mild-to-moderate, schizotypal traits, and disorganised schizotypy would explain this effect. Experiment 1 tested social stress in 16 participants with high schizotypal traits and 10 participants with mild-to-moderate schizotypal traits. The social stress test consisted of a public speech and an informal discussion. The high schizotypal group had higher heart rate than the mild-to-moderate schizotypal group during the informal discussion, but not during the public speech. Disorganised schizotypy accounted for this group difference. Experiment 2 tested the hypothesis that mild-to-moderate schizotypal traits would have a linear relationship with physiological arousal from social stress. Experiment 2 tested 24 participants with mild-to-moderate schizotypal traits performing the abovementioned social stress test while their heart rate and skin conductance responses were measured. Mild-to-moderate schizotypal traits had a linear relationship with physiological arousal during the discussion with a stranger. Distress in disorganised schizotypy may explain the heightened arousal from close social interaction in high schizotypy than mild-to-moderate schizotypy. Mild-to-moderate schizotypal traits may have a linear relationship with HR during close social interaction because of difficulty with acclimatising to the social interaction.

Item Type: Journal article
Alternative Title: Schizotypy, physiology of social stress
Publication Title: Stress
Creators: Premkumar, P., Alahakoon, P., Smith, M., Kumari, V., Babu, D. and Baker, J.
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Date: 29 July 2020
ISSN: 1025-3890
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/10253890.2020.1797674DOI
1342073Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 09 Jul 2020 07:29
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2020 14:42
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/40192

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