Re-evaluating the measurement and influence of conscious movement processing on gait performance in older adults: development of the Gait-Specific Attentional Profile

Young, W.R., Ellmers, T.J., Kinrade, N.P. ORCID: 0000-0001-6370-4628, Cossar, J. and Cocks, A.J., 2020. Re-evaluating the measurement and influence of conscious movement processing on gait performance in older adults: development of the Gait-Specific Attentional Profile. Gait & Posture, 81, pp. 73-77. ISSN 0966-6362

[img] Text
1346851_a840_Kinrade.pdf - Post-print
Full-text access embargoed until 9 July 2021.

Download (822kB)

Abstract

Background. Recent decades have seen increased interest in how anxiety–and associated changes in conscious movement processing (CMP)–can influence the control of balance and gait, particularly in older adults. However, the most prevalent scale used to measure CMP during gait (the Movement-Specific Reinvestment Scale (MSRS)) is generic (i.e., non-gait specific) and potentially lacks sensitivity in this context.

Methods. In a preliminary study, we first sought to evaluate if MSRS scores associated with the number of CMP-related thoughts self-reported by older adults while walking. The next aim was to develop and validate a new questionnaire (the Gait-Specific Attentional Profile, G-SAP) capable of measuring gait-specific CMP, in addition to other attentional processes purported to influence gait. This scale was validated using responses from 117 (exploratory) and 107 (confirmatory factor analysis) older adults, resulting in an 11-item scale with four sub-scales: CMP, anxiety, fall-related ruminations, and processing inefficiencies. Finally, in a separate cohort of 53 older adults, we evaluated associations between scores from both the GSAP CMP subscale and the MSRS, and gait outcomes measured using a GAITRite walkway in addition to participants’ fall-history.

Results. MSRS scores were not associated with self-reported thoughts categorised as representing CMP. In regression analyses that controlled for functional balance, unlike the MSRS, the G-SAP subscale of CMP significantly predicted several gait characteristics including velocity (p=.033), step length (p=.032), and double-limb support (p=.015).

Significance. The G-SAP provides gait-specific measures of four psychological factors implicated in mediating the control of balance and gait. In particular, unlike the MSRS, the G-SAP subscale of CMP appears sensitive to relevant attentional processes known to influence gait performance. We suggest that the G-SAP offers an opportunity for the research community to further develop understanding of psychological factors impacting gait performance across a range of applied clinical contexts.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Gait & Posture
Creators: Young, W.R., Ellmers, T.J., Kinrade, N.P., Cossar, J. and Cocks, A.J.
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Date: September 2020
Volume: 81
ISSN: 0966-6362
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.gaitpost.2020.07.008DOI
S0966636220302496Publisher Item Identifier
1346851Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 27 Jul 2020 15:21
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2020 14:45
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/40282

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year