Special section article using an integrated social cognition model to predict COVID-19 preventive behaviours

Wiley, J., Lin, C.-Y., Imani, V., Majd, N.R., Ghasemi, Z., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, Hamilton, K., Hagger, M.S. and Pakpour, A.H., 2020. Special section article using an integrated social cognition model to predict COVID-19 preventive behaviours. British Journal of Health Psychology. ISSN 1359-107X

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Abstract

Objectives: Rates of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) infections have rapidly increased worldwide and reached pandemic proportions. A suite of preventive behaviours have been recommended to minimize risk of COVID‐19 infection in the general population. The present study utilized an integrated social cognition model to explain COVID‐19 preventive behaviours in a sample from the Iranian general population.

Design: The study adopted a three‐wave prospective correlational design.

Methods: Members of the general public (N = 1,718, M age = 33.34, SD = 15.77, male = 796, female = 922) agreed to participate in the study. Participants completed self‐report measures of demographic characteristics, intention, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and action self‐efficacy at an initial data collection occasion. One week later, participants completed self‐report measures of maintenance self‐efficacy, action planning and coping planning, and, a further week later, measures of COVID‐19 preventive behaviours. Hypothesized relationships among social cognition constructs and COVID‐19 preventive behaviours according to the proposed integrated model were estimated using structural equation modelling.

Results: The proposed model fitted the data well according to multiple goodness‐of‐fit criteria. All proposed relationships among model constructs were statistically significant. The social cognition constructs with the largest effects on COVID‐19 preventive behaviours were coping planning (β = .575, p < .001) and action planning (β = .267, p < .001).

Conclusions: Current findings may inform the development of behavioural interventions in health care contexts by identifying intervention targets. In particular, findings suggest targeting change in coping planning and action planning may be most effective in promoting participation in COVID‐19 preventive behaviours.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: British Journal of Health Psychology
Creators: Wiley, J., Lin, C.-Y., Imani, V., Majd, N.R., Ghasemi, Z., Griffiths, M.D., Hamilton, K., Hagger, M.S. and Pakpour, A.H.
Publisher: Wiley
Date: 11 August 2020
ISSN: 1359-107X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/bjhp.12465DOI
1352298Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Jonathan Gallacher
Date Added: 12 Aug 2020 08:16
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2020 08:17
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/40435

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