The application of non-invasive, restraint-free eye-tracking methods for use with nonhuman primates

Hopper, L., Gulli, R., Howard, L., Kano, F., Krupenye, C., Ryan, A. and Paukner, A. ORCID: 0000-0002-3421-1864, 2020. The application of non-invasive, restraint-free eye-tracking methods for use with nonhuman primates. Behavior Research Methods. ISSN 1554-351X (Forthcoming)

[img] Text
1355257_Paukner.pdf - Post-print
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (858kB)

Abstract

Over the past 50 years there has been a strong interest in applying eye-tracking techniques to study a myriad of questions related to human and nonhuman primate psychological processes. Eye movements and fixations can provide qualitative and quantitative insights into cognitive processes of non-verbal populations such as nonhuman primates, clarifying the evolutionary, physiological, and representational underpinnings of human cognition. While early attempts at nonhuman primate eye tracking were relatively crude, later, more sophisticated and sensitive techniques required invasive protocols and the use of restraint. In the past decade, technology has advanced to a point where non-invasive eye-tracking techniques, developed for use with human participants, can be applied for use with nonhuman primates in a restraint-free manner. Here we review the corpus of recent studies to take such an approach. Despite the growing interest in eye-tracking research, there is still little consensus on “best practices,” both in terms of deploying test protocols or reporting methods and results. Therefore, we look to advances made in the field of developmental psychology, as well as our own collective experiences using eye trackers with nonhuman primates, to highlight key elements that researchers should consider when designing non-invasive restraint-free eye-tracking research protocols for use with nonhuman primates. Beyond promoting best practices for research protocols, we also outline an ideal approach for reporting such research and highlight future directions for the field.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Behavior Research Methods
Creators: Hopper, L., Gulli, R., Howard, L., Kano, F., Krupenye, C., Ryan, A. and Paukner, A.
Publisher: Springer
Date: 14 August 2020
ISSN: 1554-351X
Identifiers:
NumberType
1355257Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 26 Aug 2020 07:17
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2020 07:17
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/40513

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year