Maladaptive rumination mediates the relationship between self-esteem, perfectionism, and work addiction: a largescale survey study

Kun, B., Urbán, R., Bőthe, B., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, Demetrovics, Z. and Kökönyei, G., 2020. Maladaptive rumination mediates the relationship between self-esteem, perfectionism, and work addiction: a largescale survey study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (19): 7332.

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Abstract

Background: Empirical evidence suggests that low self-esteem and high perfectionism are significant personality correlates of work addiction, but the mechanisms underlying these relationships are still unclear. Consequently, exploring cognitive mechanisms will help to better understand work addiction. For instance, rumination is one of the under-researched topics in work addiction, although it may explain specific thinking processes of work-addicted individuals. The purpose of the study was to test the mediating role of maladaptive rumination (i.e., brooding) in the relationship between personality and addiction.

Methods: In a largescale cross-sectional, unrepresentative, online study, 4340 adults with a current job participated. The following psychometric instruments were used: Work Addiction Risk Test Revised, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, and Ruminative Response Scale.

Results: It was found that self-oriented perfectionism, socially prescribed perfectionism, and self-esteem had both direct and indirect relationships with work addiction via the mediating effect of maladaptive rumination. The two paths involving brooding explained 44% of the direct relationship.

Conclusions: The study demonstrated that brooding type of rumination as a putatively maladaptive strategy explains why individuals characterized by low self-esteem and high perfectionism may have a higher risk of work addiction. The results suggest that cognitive-affective mechanisms in work addiction are similar to those found in other addictive disorders.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Creators: Kun, B., Urbán, R., Bőthe, B., Griffiths, M.D., Demetrovics, Z. and Kökönyei, G.
Publisher: MDPI AG
Date: 8 October 2020
Volume: 17
Number: 19
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.3390/ijerph17197332DOI
1375357Other
Rights: © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 09 Oct 2020 15:31
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2020 15:31
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/41238

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