Manipulation of the duration of the initial self-control task within the sequential-task paradigm: effect on exercise performance

Boat, R. ORCID: 0000-0002-4897-8118, Hunte, R., Welsh, E., Dunn, A., Treadwell, E. and Cooper, S.B. ORCID: 0000-0001-5219-5020, 2020. Manipulation of the duration of the initial self-control task within the sequential-task paradigm: effect on exercise performance. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 14: 571312. ISSN 1662-453X

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Abstract

Self-control exertion on an initial task has been associated with impaired performance on subsequent physical tasks also requiring self-control; an effect suggested to be mediated by changes in perceptions of pain and motivation. However, the effects of spending longer on the initial self-control task are unknown. This study, therefore, explored the potential for the duration of the initial self-control task to influence subsequent physical performance, perceptions of pain, and perceived motivation; particularly during the early stages of the physical task. In a within-subject design, 29 participants (11 male, 18 female) completed a wall-sit task until volitional exhaustion, on four separate occasions. Prior to each wall-sit, participants completed either a non-self-control task (congruent Stroop task) for 4 min, or a self-control task (incongruent Stroop task) for 4 (short duration), 8 (medium duration), or 16 (long duration) min. Participant’s perceptions of pain and motivation were recorded every 30 s during the wall-sit. Wall-sit performance time was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and perceptions of pain and motivation analyzed using multi-level modeling. Wall-sit performance time was significantly longer on the non-self-control exertion trial compared to all other trials (all p < 0.01), as well as longer on both the short duration and medium duration self-control exertion trials compared to the long duration self-control exertion trial (both p < 0.001). Perceptions of initial (at 30 s) pain and motivation were different between the trials (main effect of trial: pain, p = 0.001; motivation, p < 0.001); whereby longer durations of self-control exertion increased perceptions of pain and decreased motivation. The decrease in motivation during the wall-sit task was greater on the long duration self-control exertion trial compared to all other trials (trial∗ time interactions, all p < 0.05). The present study provides novel evidence that spending longer on the initial self-control task led to greater detrimental effects on subsequent wall-sit performance time. Furthermore, longer duration self-control exertion tasks led to increased perceptions of pain and decreased motivation within the first 30 s of the wall-sit task, as well as a greater decrease in motivation across the wall-sit task. These attentional and motivational shifts may explain performance decrements following the exertion of self-control.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Creators: Boat, R., Hunte, R., Welsh, E., Dunn, A., Treadwell, E. and Cooper, S.B.
Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
Date: 8 October 2020
Volume: 14
ISSN: 1662-453X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.3389/fnins.2020.571312DOI
1375870Other
Rights: Copyright © 2020 Boat, Hunte, Welsh, Dunn, Treadwell and Cooper. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Jill Tomkinson
Date Added: 12 Oct 2020 15:48
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2020 15:48
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/41265

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