Depression, anxiety, and stress mediate the associations between internet gaming disorder, insomnia, and quality of life during the COVID-19 outbreak

Fazeli, S., Mohammadi Zeidi, I., Lin, C.-Y., Namdar, P., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524, Kwasi Ahorsu, D. and Pakpour, A., 2020. Depression, anxiety, and stress mediate the associations between internet gaming disorder, insomnia, and quality of life during the COVID-19 outbreak. Addictive Behaviors Reports, 12: 100307.

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Abstract

Background: or many individuals, the COVID-19 outbreak has increased their psychological distress, changed their behaviors, and impacted their health. With more time spent indoors, many individuals have engaged in increased videogame playing. However, the associations between such behaviors during the COVID-19 outbreak period is unclear.

Objective: The present study examined the mediating role of psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and stress) in the association between internet gaming disorder (IGD) and two health outcomes (insomnia quality of life) among adolescents during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising adolescents (N = 1512) aged 13–18 years (mean age = 15.51 years) was utilized to assess measures on insomnia, depression, anxiety, and stress, IGD, and quality of life during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Results: There were small to large significant relationships between the variables. Psychological distress (i.e., depression, anxiety, and stress) served as a strong mediator in the association between IGD and insomnia and quality of life. IGD directly influenced insomnia and quality of life among the participants.

Conclusions: IGD is associated with different psychosocial outcomes comprising multiple pathways. Parents need to pay special attention to how much time and how frequently their children play videogames. Parents may need to assist their children in coping with psychological distress during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic period.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Addictive Behaviors Reports
Creators: Fazeli, S., Mohammadi Zeidi, I., Lin, C.-Y., Namdar, P., Griffiths, M.D., Kwasi Ahorsu, D. and Pakpour, A.
Publisher: Elsevier
Date: December 2020
Volume: 12
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1016/j.abrep.2020.100307DOI
S235285322030122XPublisher Item Identifier
1382781Other
Rights: © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 30 Oct 2020 08:43
Last Modified: 30 Oct 2020 08:43
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/41440

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