Twelve (not so) angry men: jurors work better in small groups. Lorraine Hope and Bridget Waller propose a simple modification to jury deliberations

Hope, L. and Waller, B. ORCID: 0000-0001-6303-7458, 2011. Twelve (not so) angry men: jurors work better in small groups. Lorraine Hope and Bridget Waller propose a simple modification to jury deliberations. Criminal Justice Matters, 86 (1), pp. 8-9. ISSN 0962-7251

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Abstract

Twelve-person juries are often regarded as one of the cornerstones of democracy. In the UK, the right to a trial by jury is considered an important feature of the criminal justice system. Indeed, it has been rated as more important than a number of other rights, including the right to protest against the government, the right not to be detained for an extended period without charge and the right to free speech in public (Roberts and Hough, 2009). The public also trusts juries comprising randomly selected ordinary people and relies on the contribution of 12 individuals to eliminate bias and prejudice from the decision making process.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Criminal Justice Matters
Creators: Hope, L. and Waller, B.
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Date: 2011
Volume: 86
Number: 1
ISSN: 0962-7251
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1080/09627251.2011.646181DOI
1384200Other
Rights: ©2011 Centre for Crime and Justice Studies.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 04 Nov 2020 09:26
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2020 09:26
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/41486

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