Mediated roles of generalized trust and perceived social support in the effects of problematic social media use on mental health: a cross‐sectional study

Lin, C., Namdar, P., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524 and Pakpour, A.H., 2021. Mediated roles of generalized trust and perceived social support in the effects of problematic social media use on mental health: a cross‐sectional study. Health Expectations, 24 (1), pp. 165-173. ISSN 1369-6513

[img]
Preview
Text
1391910_Griffiths.pdf - Published version

Download (402kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Current literature lacks evidence concerning how problematic social media use associates with mental health. To address the gap, the present study used mediation models to examine whether generalized trust and perceived social support (PSS) are potential mediators in the relationship between problematic social media use and mental health.

Methods: The sample comprised Iranian adults (n = 1073; 614 females). The participants completed a number of scales to assess problematic social media use (Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale), generalized trust (Generalized Trust Scale), PSS (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, happiness (Oxford Happiness Questionnaire Short Form), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and mental quality of life (Short Form‐12).

Results: Problematic social media use had negative effects on happiness and mental quality of life via the mediators of generalized trust (bootstrapping SE = 0.017; effect = −0.041; 95% CI = −0.079, −0.012) and PSS (bootstrapping SE = 0.023; effect = −0.163; 95% CI = −0.211, −0.119). Problematic social media use had positive effects on anxiety and depression via the mediators of generalized trust (bootstrapping SE = 0.022; effect = 0.064; 95% CI = 0.026, 0.113) and PSS (bootstrapping SE = 0.024; effect = 0.052; 95% CI = 0.009, 0.102).

Conclusions: Problematic social media use, generalized trust and PSS are important factors for an individual's mental health. Health‐care providers may want to assist individuals regardless of having mental health problems in reducing their problematic social media use and improving their generalized trust and social support.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Health Expectations
Creators: Lin, C., Namdar, P., Griffiths, M.D. and Pakpour, A.H.
Publisher: Wiley
Date: February 2021
Volume: 24
Number: 1
ISSN: 1369-6513
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1111/hex.13169DOI
1391910Other
Rights: © 2020 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 01 Dec 2020 10:12
Last Modified: 19 Feb 2021 15:18
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/41734

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year