The effects of short-term low energy availability, achieved through diet or exercise, on cognitive function in oral contraceptive users and eumenorrheic women

Martin, D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8431-6659, Papageorgiou, M., Colgan, H., Bandelow, S., Greeves, J., Tang, J.C.Y., Fraser, W., Cooper, S.B. ORCID: 0000-0001-5219-5020, Sale, C. ORCID: 0000-0002-5816-4169 and Elliott-Sale, K.J. ORCID: 0000-0003-1122-5099, 2021. The effects of short-term low energy availability, achieved through diet or exercise, on cognitive function in oral contraceptive users and eumenorrheic women. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. ISSN 1715-5312

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Abstract

To date, no research has explored the effects of low energy availability on cognitive performance using dietary and exercise regimens relevant to athletes. Twenty female participants (10 eumenorrheic, 10 oral contraceptive [OC] users) completed three 3-day conditions: 1) controlled-balanced energy availability without exercise (BAL; 45 kcal·kg lean body mass [LBM]−1·day−1); 2) diet-induced low energy availability without exercise (DIET; 15 kcal·kg LBM−1·day−1); and 3) exercise-induced low energy availability (EX; 15 kcal·kg LBM−1·day−1, including 30 kcal·kg LBM−1·day−1 treadmill running at 70% maximal oxygen uptake). A cognitive test battery was completed before and after each 3-day condition. Mental rotation test accuracy improved in the BAL condition, but there was a decline in accuracy in the EX condition (BAL, +2.5%; EX, −1.4%; P = 0.042, d = 0.85). DIET (+1.3%) was not different to BAL or EX (P > 0.05). All other measures of cognitive performance were not affected by condition (P > 0.05) and OC use did not affect cognitive responses (P > 0.05). Accuracy in the mental rotation test was impaired when low energy availability was induced through increased exercise energy expenditure. All other aspects of cognition were unaffected by 3 days of low energy availability through diet or exercise. OC use did not mediate the effect of low energy availability on cognition.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
Creators: Martin, D., Papageorgiou, M., Colgan, H., Bandelow, S., Greeves, J., Tang, J.C.Y., Fraser, W., Cooper, S.B., Sale, C. and Elliott-Sale, K.J.
Publisher: Canadian Science Publishing
Date: 5 January 2021
ISSN: 1715-5312
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.1139/apnm-2020-0474DOI
1405125Other
Divisions: Schools > School of Science and Technology
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 02 Feb 2021 11:39
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2021 12:09
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/42170

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