Neurophysiology of prospective memory in typical and atypical ageing

Crook-Rumsey, M. ORCID: 0000-0003-3031-3502, 2020. Neurophysiology of prospective memory in typical and atypical ageing. PhD, Nottingham Trent University.

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Abstract

The ability to delay an intention is known as ‘prospective memory’ (PM) and underpins many day-to-day activities. The ubiquity of PM makes it essential for independent living in older adults. Research suggests that PM function declines as we age and may be further exacerbated with the development of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). To date, there has been no research examining the neurophysiology of PM in older adults with MCI. This thesis addresses a series of questions to help understand the neurophysiology of PM and how it may be affected by ageing and MCI: 1) Are there neurophysiological differences between highly salient PM cues and less salient PM cues? 2) Can the neurophysiological reorientation of attention be identified in PM tasks? 3) Are there behavioural and neurophysiological differences between young adults, older adults and older adults with MCI during PM tasks? 4) Are there behavioural and neurophysiological differences when maintaining a PM intention between young adults, older adults and older adults with MCI? 5) Can machine learning be used to understand spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity in response to PM between young adults, older adults and older adults with MCI? To answer these questions behavioural and time-locked electroencephalographic (EEG) responses were examined during PM tasks and were modelled with a machine learning method known as Spiking Neural Networks (SNN). Results suggest that: there are behavioural and neurophysiological differences between the PM cues and the neurophysiological reorientation of attention can be detected in PM tasks; older adults are not impaired in PM tasks possibly due to compensatory neural mechanisms; older adults with MCI may be impaired in some PM tasks, which may be due to deficits in attention and feelings of knowing; modelling PM with SNNs may offer useful ways of understanding spatiotemporal connectivity in PM and MCI.

Item Type: Thesis
Creators: Crook-Rumsey, M.
Date: June 2020
Rights: This work is the intellectual property of the author. You may copy up to 5% of this work for private study, or personal, non-commercial research. Any re-use of the information contained within this document should be fully referenced, quoting the author, title university, degree level and pagination. Queries or requests for any other use, or if a more substantial copy is required, should be directed to the owner of the Intellectual Property Rights.
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Linda Sullivan
Date Added: 15 Apr 2021 09:32
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2021 09:32
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/42703

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