Motivation to have COVID-19 vaccination explained using an extended protection motivation theory among university students in China: the role of information sources

Wang, P.-W., Ahorsu, D.K., Lin, C.-Y., Chen, I.-H., Yen, C.-F., Kuo, Y.-J., Griffiths, M.D. ORCID: 0000-0001-8880-6524 and Pakpour, A.H., 2021. Motivation to have COVID-19 vaccination explained using an extended protection motivation theory among university students in China: the role of information sources. Vaccines, 9 (4): 380. ISSN 2076-393X

[img]
Preview
Text
1431416_Griffiths.pdf - Published version

Download (399kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: The aims of the present study were to examine the prediction of the threat and coping appraisal utilizing an extended protection motivation theory (PMT) for the motivation to have COVID-19 vaccination and the influence of various information sources on coping appraisal among university students in China.

Methods: The sample comprised 3145 students from 43 universities in China who completed an online survey including PMT constructs as well as constructs added to PMT. The PMT constructs comprised motivation to have COVID-19 vaccination, threat appraisal, and coping appraisal. The extended PMT constructs comprised knowledge about mechanisms and information sources of COVID-19 vaccination.

Results: Perceived severity of COVID-19 was positively associated with motivation to have COVID-19 vaccination. Receiving information concerning COVID-19 vaccination from medical personnel was associated with greater self-efficacy, response efficacy, and knowledge, whereas receiving information concerning COVID-19 vaccination from coworkers/colleagues was associated with less response efficacy and knowledge. Receiving online information concerning COVID-19 vaccination was associated with greater response cost of vaccination efficacy and less knowledge.

Conclusions: This study supported the prediction of perceived severity in the PMT for motivation to have COVID-19 vaccination among university students in China. Vaccination information sources have different effects on students' coping appraisal of COVID-19 vaccination.

Item Type: Journal article
Publication Title: Vaccines
Creators: Wang, P.-W., Ahorsu, D.K., Lin, C.-Y., Chen, I.-H., Yen, C.-F., Kuo, Y.-J., Griffiths, M.D. and Pakpour, A.H.
Publisher: MDPI
Date: 13 April 2021
Volume: 9
Number: 4
ISSN: 2076-393X
Identifiers:
NumberType
10.3390/vaccines9040380DOI
1431416Other
Rights: © 2021 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and con‐ ditions of the Creative Commons At‐ tribution (CC BY) license (http://cre‐ ativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Divisions: Schools > School of Social Sciences
Record created by: Jeremy Silvester
Date Added: 21 Apr 2021 11:15
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2021 11:15
URI: http://irep.ntu.ac.uk/id/eprint/42736

Actions (login required)

Edit View Edit View

Views

Views per month over past year

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year